How to Install a Natural Gas Barbecue Grill

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 13, 2017

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwAFtayK4bE

Ask This Old House heating and plumbing expert Richard Trethewey helps a homeowner install a natural gas line to fire up his backyard barbecue grill. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 3-4 hours Cost: $2500 Skill Level: Professional Tools:
Adjustable wrench Press tool
Drill/driver
Emery cloth
Masonry bit Shopping List:
Grill with natural gas hook-up
Steel pipe
Steel pipe fittings
Concrete screws
Steel brackets Steps:
1. This is a dangerous job and should be left to a licensed gas fitter. 2. Turn off the flow of natural gas from the street into the house meter using a pipe wrench. 3. Find a good place to tap into the current natural gas line. Remove the cap on the line using a pipe wrench. 4. Use threaded steel pipe for the small pipe run. Dry fit the connections before applying pipe dope around the threads and making permanent connections. 5. Tighten up the threaded connections using two pipe wrenches and opposing force. 6. Use a press tool to compress an o-ring lined elbow to the current pipe run. 7. Be sure to clean each pipe end to form a strong seal with fittings using an emery cloth or a sanding attachment for a drill/driver. 8. Use a press tool to compress the fittings over the entire run. 9. If attaching the pipe run to the side of the house, use a drill/driver and a masonry bit to make holes in the foundation. 10. Use the drill/driver and concrete screws to attach the pipe run with brackets. 11. Bring pipe run down to where the grill is located. 12. Be sure to include a shut off valve for service. 13. Attach a T-fitting toward the grill. 14. Extend the pipe past the T-fitting to create a drip leg for any rust that could form in the pipe and cap the pipe. 15. Use a quick connect fitting to extend the pipe run to the grill quick connect fitting. 16. Use an adjustable wrench to turn the gas back on at the meter. 17. Use a soap solution to check for potential gas leaks along all of the fitting connections. If there are any leaks, bubbles will appear. Resources: Richard installed a Genesis S-330 natural gas grill, manufactured by Weber. (https://www.weber.com/US/en) Richard used the MegaPress system by Ridgid for making the natural gas connections. (https://www.ridgid.com/) Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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