Solving a Spitting Faucet Mystery

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on February 19, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTilMO3w7kI

Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/ask-toh-spitting-faucet-painting-101 Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey diagnoses and repairs a water system with air in it. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Skill Level: Expert Tools List for Fixing a Spitting Faucet:
Pipe cutter
Blow torch Shopping List:
Ball Valve
Solder
Flux
Radon test kit Steps:
1. When dealing with water issues, start from the main water shut off and work your way back. Identify any areas where air is introduced to the system.
2. Check any potential obstructions in the water line. If there’s a filter, a pump, or anything other than a water line, check to make sure it’s working properly.
3. Water filters are naturally designed to clog, so be sure to check them often and change them regularly, as that could cause obstructions.
4. It’s also possible to put flow restrictors on the water line, which could be a simple ball valve with the handle removed, to control how much water enters and leaves various parts of the system, like a radon mitigation unit. Cut the line in the desired area and solder the valve in. Once the valve is set to the desired setting, remove the handle to prevent accidental changes to the valve.
5. If water flow is an issue, identify appliances that use an excess amount of water and consider replacing them with water conserving appliances. Resources:
Richard added a ball valve to act as a flow restrictor, which can be found at home centers and plumbing supply stores. Richard recommends that homeowners test their water for radon. Those kits can be purchased at home centers and have easy-to-follow instructions. Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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How to Paint a Room Like a Pro

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on February 19, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2_kmWm3P1I

Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/ask-toh-spitting-faucet-painting-101 Ask This Old House painter Mauro Henrique teaches a homeowner the basics of painting a room. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Cost: $300 Skill Level: Beginner Tools List:
Paint brushes in a variety of sizes
Paint roller
Putty knife
Caulking gun
Utility knife Shopping List:
Paint
Drop cloths
Painter’s tape
Microfiber roll for paint roller
Liquid mask
Paint additive
Paintable caulking Steps:
1. Before starting work, remove or protect any furniture in the room with drop cloths. Protect where the floor meets the wall with painter’s tape.
2. When painting, always start at the top of the room and work your way down. Always pour paint into a separate container. 3. Paint the ceiling with a matte paint and the roller.
4. Paint the trim, including window trim, chair rails, and door casings with a semi-gloss paint and a 1 ½” synthetic paint brush. Start from the top and work down.
5. For painting around windows, apply a liquid mask to the glass with a paint brush instead of using painter’s tape. The liquid acts like a spot primer if it gets on the sash, and it will protect the glass while painting.
6. Once the mask turns clear, add a second coat and wait for that to turn clear as well.
7. Paint the window frame, starting from the inside closest to the glass, and work your way out. To keep paint from getting into the cracks between the window and the jamb, slide a putty knife in the crack and drag it down as you paint. Add a paint additive if necessary to thin out the paint being applied around the windows.
8. Once the window frame is painted, paint the casing, then the window sill. For the side of the casing, keep the brush parallel to the wall and drag the brush all the way down the side of the casing.
9. Apply a second coat to the window trim, chair rails, and door casings.
10. Paint the walls using eggshell paint in most rooms. Low traffic rooms, like a bedroom, can use a matte finish.
11. Cut the edges around the walls with a 2 ½” synthetic brush. Carefully drag the brush in a motion away from the ceiling and trim to prevent it from spilling over.
12. Paint the rest of the walls with a microfiber roller.
13. Before applying the final coat, using paintable caulking to fill in any gaps between trim, baseboards, etc.
14. Apply a second coat to the walls.
15. Clean up the drop cloths and painter’s tape. To remove the liquid mask, cut around the glass with a utility knife and peel it back slowly. Resources:
All the painting supplies Mauro used on this project, including the brushes, rollers, drop clothes, and paint additive, can all be found at home centers and paint supply stores. Mauro painted the room using Behr Marquee paint (http://www.behr.com/consumer/marquee-interior-collection). The top of the wall used the color Stargazer (http://www.behr.com/consumer/ColorDetailView/N510-3), and the trim and the bottom of the wall used the color Bit of Sugar (http://www.behr.com/consumer/ColorDetailView/PR-W14). The trim had a semi-gloss finish and the walls had an eggshell finish. Mauro demonstrated Masking Liquid H20, a water based clear coating that can mask window panes when painting a window.  It is manufactured by Associated Paint Inc (http://associatedpaint.com/maskingliquidh2o/). Expert assistance for this project was provided by Mauro’s Painting (http://maurospainting.com/). Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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House Tour: Elegant Suburban Home

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on February 15, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AlhF_xxtz38

Designer Alison Habermehl shares an elegant family home she designed that’s both kid-friendly and great for entertaining. See how she created the contemporary space with a brand new extension in the kitchen, custom millwork and pieces that are durable and cozy, but still offer a formal look. Alison Habermehl: http://www.habermehldesigngroup.com/ To see more visit https://houseandhome.com/videos/ ———- MORE DESIGN INSPIRATION
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TOH: Trade School- Exclusive Preview of Follow the Winding Brick Path!

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on February 14, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SUQlVESV0fE

Roger Cook creates a winding brick path. Kitchen designer Kathy Marshall shares the challenges of fitting a modern kitchen into an old house. Norm Abram makes wainscoting out of old sheathing boards. Tom Silva tells Kevin O'Connor that our red house will now be blue. Eleven-inch-wide white oak floor boards go down.

How to Update a Kitchen on a Budget

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on February 12, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oys7oIAXkjE

Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/ask-toh-lawn-care-futuristic-workshop Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey goes over low-budget kitchen upgrades. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 2 hours Cost: $200 and up Skill Level: Moderate Shopping List:
Countertop
Faucet
Sink Steps:
1. The simplest way to refresh a kitchen is by replacing the faucet. Most new faucets come with cover plates to hide holes from old hot and cold lines.
2. If there are holes in the sink from an old spray nozzle, they sell soap dispensers and water filters that can fit in those holes as a replacement.
3. Another way to update a kitchen is by changing out the sink. The most common types of sinks include self-rimming (or surface mounted) sinks and under-mounted sinks. Because the way the holes are cut in countertops, it’s hard to switch between the two types of sinks without also replacing the countertop. For laminate countertops, stick with a surface mounted sink.
4. Replacing the countertops is a slightly more expensive way to update the look of a kitchen. Stone countertops come in a variety of styles and colors that range in price based on how readily available they are for quarrying. Stick with more common stones to save thousands on replacing the countertops. Resources:
Kitchen sinks, faucets, and countertops are available at home centers and kitchen supply stores. Expert assistance on this segment was provided by International Stone, Inc. (http://www.internationalstoneinc.com/) Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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