Future House | Touring a Napa Valley Smart House

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 19, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfvd3LzVmhg

Ask This Old House home technology expert Ross Trethewey travels to Napa to tour a house that’s testing out a variety of interconnected smart home devices. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Resources:
Jason Johnson is the CEO of August Smart Lock (www.august.com), which manufactures the doorbell video cameras and smart lock system that integrates with a traditional deadbolt. The exterior camera system was manufactured by Arlo (https://www.arlo.com), which is a division of NETGEAR. The smart thermostats that also serve as digital assistants are manufactured by Ecobee (https://www.ecobee.com). Jason was able to integrate several smart home devices using the IFTTT platform (https://ifttt.com). The “smart windows” used a combination of technologies to work. The motorized windows were manufactured by Loewen (https://www.loewen.com) and were connected to IFTTT using a Z wave controller. IFTTT was connected to the local weather station and the Ecobee thermostats to determine indoor and outdoor temperatures and open and close the windows according to programmed parameters. Expert assistance with this project was provided by TE2 Engineering (http://te2engineering.com). Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, future house, ask this old house, ross trethewey, smart home, Napa Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/stair-railing-smart-show-house-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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How to Diagnose a Frosty Air Conditioner

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 17, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UpYoOi89Mmo

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey discusses the possible causes and solutions for a frozen air conditioner. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Skill Level: Easy Tools List for Diagnosing a Frosty Air Conditioner:
Vacuum cleaner
Dust attachment for vacuum Shopping List:
Air filter for AC unit Steps:
1. Usually, ice on an air conditioner indicates that the airflow between the coil and the condenser unit is out of balance.
2. Replace a disposable air filter or clean a reusable one to maximize airflow on the indoor unit.
3. Check for obstructions on the condenser unit outside. Clean off any leaves or droppings that may be on or near the condenser, but work very carefully to avoid bending or damaging the fins. A vacuum with the brush attachment can usually do the trick.
4. Be sure to install a unit that is properly sized. If you add insulation to the house, your air conditioning unit may need to be changed for a smaller one.
5. If none of these solutions solves the problem, there could be a refrigerant leak. Hire a professional to investigate further. Resources:
Air filters on HVAC equipment should be changed or cleaned periodically. Replacement air filters come in many sizes and can be purchased at home centers. Reusable filters should be cleaned at least once per season, more regularly in homes with pets. Outdoor units should be cleaned with a vaccum brush attachment and kept clear of bushes and other obstructions. A professional HVAC contractor can help assess if a system may be oversized and need replacement or if the refrigerant is recharged incorrectly. Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, richard trethewey, kevin o'connor, air conditioning, diagnose, repair, ask this old house, plumbing Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/stair-railing-smart-show-house-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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How to Fix a Loose Hand Railing End Cap

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 16, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxZtatnoINI

How to Fix a Loose Hand Railing End Cap Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 1 hour Cost: $20 Skill Level:
Beginner Tools List for Fixing a Loose Hand Railing End Cap:
Small, flathead screwdriver
Measuring tape
Drill
Hammer
Pliers Shopping List:
8 penny finish nail
Polyurethane glue Steps:
1. Carefully pry out the bung underneath the end cap with a flathead screwdriver.
2. Loosen the stair railing nut from the bolt using the screwdriver and remove the end cap from the stair railing.
3. At the thickest part of the end cap, measure to find the center of the railing end cap and mark it about ⅜” from the top of the end cap.
4. Drill a small starter hole into the end cap on the mark.
5. Hammer the nail into the hole and cut most of the end off with the pliers so the nail has a sharp point.
6. Measure the stair railing to find the same point as the end cap and mark it with a pencil.
7. Drill another small hole into the railing on the mark.
8. Apply some polyurethane glue to the railing bolt and also to the end grain of the end cap.
9. Carefully attach the end cap back on the stair railing. It might be difficult to get the nut back on the railing bolt, but the screwdriver can be used to hold it into place.
10. Tighten the nut back on the railing bolt with the screwdriver and a hammer.
11. Fit the bung back in the hole. Resources:
Railing parts to fit a variety of applications can be found at home centers, as can both the railing bolt with a wood thread and machine thread and the spring style connection. Tom used Clear Gorilla Glue (https://www.gorillatough.com/) to hold the railing pieces together, which can be found at home centers. Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, tom silva, stairs, railing, repair, end cap, ask this old house, Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/stair-railing-smart-show-house-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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How to Waterproof Concrete Brick

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 14, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbDnXqAVhQ8

Ask This Old House mason Mark McCullough explains and demonstrates the benefits of waterproofing concrete brick. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 2 hours Cost: $300 Skill Level: Moderate Tools List for Waterproofing Concrete Brick:
Paint roller Shopping List:
Waterproofing agent
Bucket Steps:
1. Pour the waterproofing agent into the bucket.
2. Dip the paint roller into the waterproofing agent and apply it generously to the brick, bottom to top.
3. The agent will cure in 14 days. Resources:
Mark applied Siloxane 20 solvent-based water repellant, manufactured by Umaco (http://www.umaco.com/). Expert assistance for this segment was provided by MJM Masonry (http://mjmmasonry.com). Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, mark mccullough, kevin o'connor, concrete brick, sealants, waterproofing, masonry, ask this old house Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/jimmy-diresta-trough-planter-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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