How to Connect an Ice Maker Like a Pro

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 15, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzFYO3BpYdE

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey helps a special homeowner hook up her refrigerator with an ice maker. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 2-3 hours
Cost: $30 Skill Level: Moderate Tools List for Connecting an Ice Maker:
Drill
Feeler bit
Pipe cutter
Bucket
Wrench Shopping List:
¼” copper tubing
Copper T fitting
Multi-turn shut off valve with a compression connection
Abrasive cloth
Pipe cleaner
Solder
Flux
Flux brush Steps:
1. Shut the water off to the house.
2. Locate the nearest cold water line and determine its location compared to the location of the fridge.
3. With that in mind, pull out the fridge and drill down with a feeler bit as close to the cold water line as possible.
4. Use the feeler bit to determine the best location to drill for the water line. Drill the hole.
5. Carefully uncoil the copper tubing and run it through the hole and close to the water line.
6. Determine where the water line will be cut. Clean that area with the abrasive cloth and cut it with a pipe cutter. Have a bucket ready to catch any water that comes out.
7. Once it’s dry, apply flux to the outside of the T and the inside of the pipe and the multi turn shut off valve.
8. Fit the pipe, the T, and the shutoff valve together and solder it.
9. Connect the ¼” copper tubing to the other side of the shutoff valve with the compression connection.
10. Go back to the fridge and uncoil the rest of the copper tubing. Leave extra slack high on the fridge so that it can still be easily moved in and out.
11. Find the opening in the back of the fridge to receive the copper tubing and screw it into place.
12. Put the fridge back in the opening and turn the water back on. Resources:
While there are plenty of homeowner friendly kits available for ice maker hookups, Richard suggests doing a little extra work to ensure a secure connection that will last for a long time. Richard replaced the plastic tubing for copper tubing, and instead of using a saddle valve, he connected it to the cold water line using a compression connection with a multi turn valve, which he soldered into the cold water pipe using a T fitting. All of these materials are available at home centers and plumbing supply houses. Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, richard trethewey, jenn nawada, ask this old house, plumbing, refrigerator, kitchen, ice maker Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/paint-stripping-fridge-hookup-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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TOH: Trade School- Exclusive Preview of Awnings, Countertops and Air Conditioning!

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 14, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjmUf5yFpcY

A retractable awning gets installed. New soapstone countertops get sealed with wax, not oil, for a more durable finish. Andy dresses up the half-walls with oak caps and a scotia molding. The light fixtures are being made by New England blacksmiths. Richard tells us why the ERV unit is possibly the most important piece of mechanical equipment in the house.

Getting Started with a Chisel

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 14, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_3iow62bq4

Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva explains basic chiseling techniques. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Skill Level: Beginner Tools List for Getting Started with Chisels:
Chisels
Whetstone
Grinding wheel Steps:
1. Buy a set of chisels of varying widths with high quality steel.
2. Chisels with wooden handles are meant for more delicate jobs and can only be hit with a rubber mallet or used by hand.
3. Chisels with metal ends can be hit with a hammer.
4. To make a basic cut, hold the chisel perpendicular to the surface being chiseled and tap it in to set the depth. Make a few cuts in this way across the entire section being chiseled.
5. To actually chisel out the material, hold the chisel roughly parallel to the surface, bevel side down, and use the bevel against the surface to control how much is being taken out.
6. To sharpen a chisel, hold it flat against a whetstone and drag it back and forth until it’s sharp.
7. For seriously damaged chisels, a grinding wheel can be used with a sharpening jig attached to it. Resources:
Tom suggests buying a few chisels with a variety of different widths, all with high quality steel. These can be purchased at home centers and woodworking supply stores. To sharpen a chisel, usually a honing stone or a whetstone can get the job done. Tom used a diamond whetstone, manufactured by DMT (https://www.dmtsharp.com/). For more serious sharpening jobs, a grinder with a chisel sharpening jig can be used. Those can found at lumberyards and specialty woodworking stores. Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, tom silva, kevin o'connor, ask this old house, chisel Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/paint-stripping-fridge-hookup-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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How to Install an Alternative to Gutters

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 10, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2eLdeTl35c

Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva installs an alternative to a gutter when a traditional one does not work. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 2 hours Cost: $50 Skill Level: Beginner Tools List for Installing Gutter Alternatives:
Ladder
Hammer
Prybar
Drill driver
Measuring tape Shopping List:
Aluminum rain dispersal system Steps:
1. Remove the old gutter by prying off the spikes with a hammer and a prybar. Then, unscrew the gutter from the fascia with the drill driver.
2. Mark 10” from the end of the house, then 30” from the end of the house, then 50” from the end.
3. Screw the mounting brackets on your marks as far down the fascia board as possible. It should be at least 4” down from the roof edge and 1 ½” from the drip edge.
4. Clip the louvres on the rain dispersal system into the brackets.
5. Repeat the process as necessary to cover the whole side of the house. Resources:
In most circumstances, traditional style gutters are the most effective at diverting water as far away from structures as possible, but they also require a downspout in order to redirect that water. In cases where large sections of roof require a gutter and there is no good place for a downspout, a rain dispersal system can be a viable option. Tom installed a white aluminum rain dispersal system, manufactured by Rainhandler (https://www.rainhandler.com/). The system comes with screws, brackets, and extenders if the fascia board is too short. Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, tom silva, gutters, drainage, install, exterior, ask this old house Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/gutterless-gutters-desert-plan-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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Future House | Energy Monitor Update

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 8, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aricwKB9aY0

Ask This Old House home technology expert Ross Trethewey and plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey update host Kevin O’Connor on a Future House technology. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Cost: $300 Resources:
Ross and Richard discussed what they’ve learned from using the home energy monitor, manufactured by Sense (https://sense.com), for over a year. To watch the previous segment where Ross goes more in depth on how the energy monitor works, click here: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/how-to/future-house-smarter-home-electrical-metering Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, ross trethewey, kevin o'connor, richard trethewey, future house, energy monitor, technology, ask this old house Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/gutterless-gutters-desert-plan-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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