How to Fix a Loose Hand Railing End Cap

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 16, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxZtatnoINI

How to Fix a Loose Hand Railing End Cap Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 1 hour Cost: $20 Skill Level:
Beginner Tools List for Fixing a Loose Hand Railing End Cap:
Small, flathead screwdriver
Measuring tape
Drill
Hammer
Pliers Shopping List:
8 penny finish nail
Polyurethane glue Steps:
1. Carefully pry out the bung underneath the end cap with a flathead screwdriver.
2. Loosen the stair railing nut from the bolt using the screwdriver and remove the end cap from the stair railing.
3. At the thickest part of the end cap, measure to find the center of the railing end cap and mark it about ⅜” from the top of the end cap.
4. Drill a small starter hole into the end cap on the mark.
5. Hammer the nail into the hole and cut most of the end off with the pliers so the nail has a sharp point.
6. Measure the stair railing to find the same point as the end cap and mark it with a pencil.
7. Drill another small hole into the railing on the mark.
8. Apply some polyurethane glue to the railing bolt and also to the end grain of the end cap.
9. Carefully attach the end cap back on the stair railing. It might be difficult to get the nut back on the railing bolt, but the screwdriver can be used to hold it into place.
10. Tighten the nut back on the railing bolt with the screwdriver and a hammer.
11. Fit the bung back in the hole. Resources:
Railing parts to fit a variety of applications can be found at home centers, as can both the railing bolt with a wood thread and machine thread and the spring style connection. Tom used Clear Gorilla Glue (https://www.gorillatough.com/) to hold the railing pieces together, which can be found at home centers. Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, tom silva, stairs, railing, repair, end cap, ask this old house, Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/stair-railing-smart-show-house-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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How to Waterproof Concrete Brick

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 14, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbDnXqAVhQ8

Ask This Old House mason Mark McCullough explains and demonstrates the benefits of waterproofing concrete brick. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 2 hours Cost: $300 Skill Level: Moderate Tools List for Waterproofing Concrete Brick:
Paint roller Shopping List:
Waterproofing agent
Bucket Steps:
1. Pour the waterproofing agent into the bucket.
2. Dip the paint roller into the waterproofing agent and apply it generously to the brick, bottom to top.
3. The agent will cure in 14 days. Resources:
Mark applied Siloxane 20 solvent-based water repellant, manufactured by Umaco (http://www.umaco.com/). Expert assistance for this segment was provided by MJM Masonry (http://mjmmasonry.com). Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, mark mccullough, kevin o'connor, concrete brick, sealants, waterproofing, masonry, ask this old house Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/jimmy-diresta-trough-planter-ask-toh Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
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Energy By the Numbers – Nuclear Energy (2017)

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 14, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DA2Rshec2D8

Learn some fast facts about nuclear energy.

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Room Tour: Parisian-Inspired Kitchen Makeover

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 13, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjxfVRi2RZ8

Minimalism meets Parisian style in this small galley kitchen makeover by designer Linnea Lions. See how she used a striking black and white palette and added wow-factor with copper details to give homeowner Suzanne Dugard the kitchen of her dreams. Linnea also managed to fit a banquette dining area, which doubles as a prep surface, in the small space. Linnea Lions: http://www.linnealions.com/ WHERE TO BUY: Cabinetry, System 2 Inc; Countertops, Vicostone by Apex custom Fabrication; Upholstery, Re-Wrap; Hardware, School House; Sink, Blanco Silgranit; Faucet, Brizo. To see more visit https://houseandhome.com/videos/ ———- MORE DESIGN INSPIRATION
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How to Wire for a New Ceiling Light

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on April 12, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0G1tQKNlC2I

Ask This Old House electrician Scott Caron installs a new switch and ceiling fixture for a homeowner. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 2 hours Cost: $100 Skill Level: Expert Tools List for Wiring a New Ceiling Light:
Oscillating saw
Pliers
Drill Shopping List:
LED light fixture
Electrical mounting box
Electrical single gang box
Electrical wire
Wire nuts
Electric staples
Fish tape
Electrical tape
Madison bars
Light switch
Light switch cover Steps:
1. Before doing any electrical work, always shut off power to the house at the main breaker.
2. Trace the mounting box on the ceiling where the light fixture will be mounted.
3. Cut out the traced hole with an oscillating saw.
4. Determine a location for the light switch. It should be 48” from the floor.
5. Trace the electrical box for the switch and cut it out the same way as the mounting box.
6. Locate a source of power for the switch, either at a junction box or at the main electrical panel.
7. Connect the electrical wire to your source of power using the pliers and wire nuts and fish it through the joists until it reaches the light switch. Secure the wire to the joists with electric staples.
8. Drill through the floor in the correct stud bay and send the wires for the switch and the light up to the switch using the fish tape.
9. Mount the electrical box with Madison bars in the wall and wire the switch.
10. Screw the switch into the box and then cover it with the cover plate.
11. Cut a temporary access hole in the wall and fish wires from the fixture mount in the ceiling to the temporary hole, and then from the temporary hole through the joist back down to the basement where the switch was wired.
12. Mount the electrical box in the ceiling with more Madison bars and screws.
13. Wire the new fixture in the box and mount it to the ceiling.
14. Patch the wall where the temporary hole was cut.
15. Turn the power back on. Resources:
Scott installed the "Boxie" ceiling-mounted LED fixture, manufactured by Tech Lighting (http://www.techlighting.com/Products/Fixtures/Flush-Mounts/Boxie-Ceiling). Basic electrical items like switch boxes, ceiling boxes, 14 gauge Romex wire, and switches can be found at a home center or electrical supply house. Expert assistance with this project was provided by Caron Electric (http://www.caronelectric.com/) and Wolfers Lighting (http://www.wolfers.com/). Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
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