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Plumbing Services

Sewer Lateral Upgrading, Clogged Toilets and Drains, Hydrojetting, Plumbing Appliances, Sump Pump Repairs , Septic Tank & Grease Traps , Sub-Metering , Drain Cleaning , Faucet Repair , Home Kitchen and Bathroom Remodeling , Leak Detection , Sewer Inspection , Water Heater Repair and Installation

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We have senior citizen discounts, and social media discounts. All prices fair and workmanship is guaranteed. Licensed, bonded and insured plumbers deliver quality plumbing services fast. Contact us today! Call us today at 510-210-5570 for FREE quote.


Complete Residential & Commercial Services by a Master Plumber

We Service, Repair & Maintain the following: Sewer Lateral Upgrading Gas Systems Hydrojetting Plumbing Appliances Pump Repairs Septic Tank & Grease Traps Sub-Metering Drain Cleaning Faucet Repair Home Remodeling Leak Detection Sewer Inspection Water Heater Repair For more information, call us at 510-210-5570 for the best San Francisco Bay Area plumbing services.

Latest posts

SF Bay Area Emergency Plumber and Sewer Services | Call (510) 210-5570(510) 210-5570 for Free Consultation

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on June 7, 2015

Call us for a free quote: 510-210-5570

Plumbing problems? Need to find a 24 hour plumber? Thinking about a remodeling project? Our Bay Area professional plumbers are the best SF Bay Area plumbers in the industry! Call now for a FREE quote: http://plumbing-hq.com/

Finding plumbing and sewer repair services from a licensed Bay Area plumber is often a difficult task to realize, and that’s why you're in the right place. Bay Area Plumbing Headquarters has been providing plumbing and sewer solutions to residential and commercial customers in all 101 Bay Area cities: including other Bay Area plumbers! We’re rated A+, with plumbers who are licensed, bonded and insured, so use our services with full confidence.

Our reliable Bay Area local plumbers in northern California provide comercial plumbing and residential plumbing services including repair, installation and replacement of sump pumps, kitchen faucets, bathroom fixtures, sewer line cleaning, drain cleaning, french drains, toilet plumbing, and much more.

If you are looking for a plumber near you, from Napa Valley to Silicon Valley, San Francisco and throughout the East Bay, we provide plumbing in San Jose, plumber in San Mateo, plumber in San Francisco, plumber in Oakland, plumber in Richmond, plumbing in Concord, plumbers in Antioch, Berkeley plumbers and more. In fact, we provide licensed plumbing services and 24 hours plumbing repair and services in all nine Bay Area counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.
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How to Grow Culinary Herbs

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 3, 2016

Watch the full episode: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/tv/ask-toh/video/0,,21002944,00.html

Ask This Old House general landscaper Roger Cook gets a lesson on growing herbs you can eat from horticulturist Carrie Kelly. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)

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Shopping List for How to Grow Culinary Herbs:
– 6-inch clay pot
– Soil with compost and perlite
– Chives
– Parsley
– Tarragon
– Mint
– Rosemary
– Thyme
– Oregano
– Basil

Tools for How to Grow Culinary Herbs:
– Gardening gloves

Steps for How to Grow Culinary Herbs:
1. Fill up clay pot about half way with soil with compost and perlite.
2. Remove the herb plant from its temporary plastic pot and tease out the roots gently, then place it in the clay pot.
3. Fill in empty space with more soil. Don’t pack in soil too tightly.
4. Put a quick pour of organic fertilizer in a watering can and give the plant a good soaking.
5. If you’re grouping herb plants together, try to group them together in accordance with needs. For example, chives, parsley and tarragon all require about six hours of sunlight a day and need to stay moist.
6. Rosemary, thyme and oregano can also be grouped together. They like about six to eight hours of sunlight and can dry out a bit.
7. Always plant mint alone because it will spread out and take over anything else that’s in the container.
8. To harvest, let your herbs grow to be about six inches tall.
9. Basil can be pinched off at the top to encourage new growth.
10. Parsley can be pinched off on the outside with the new growth coming from the center.
11. Chives can be cut right off the top like a haircut.
12. If the herbs are not getting enough sunlight, consider buying a grow light as a supplement.

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How to Replace Basement Bulkhead Doors

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 3, 2016

Watch the FULL episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pB9-BGm5cRI

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This Old House general contractor Tom Silva helps a homeowner install a new pair of basement bulkhead doors. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)

Shopping List for How to Replace Basement Bulkhead Doors:
– Steel bulkhead door
– Fast-setting grout, for filling voids in foundation walls
– Pressure-treated lumber, to make new sills
– 3-inch decking screws, for attaching sills to house framing
– 3-inch masonry screws, for attaching sills to foundation
– Self-stick membrane, applied to pressure-treated lumber
– Metal spray primer, for protecting fresh cut ends of metal parts
– Silicone sealant, to seal flashing
– Exterior-grade oil-based paint, to serve as a topcoat finish

Tools List for How to Replace Basement Bulkhead Doors:
– Right-angle grinder with a cutoff wheel, to cut through old door hinges
– Flay bar, for prying
– 1/2-inch drill with mixing paddle, to mix grout
– Two 5-gallon buckets, one for mixing grout, one to hold water
– 3-inch paintbrush, used to wet concrete prior to grouting
– Pointed brick trowel, for smoothing grout
– Circular saw, to cut lumber
– Layout square, for making square crosscuts in lumber
– Cordless drill
– Hammer drill, to drive in masonry screws
– Utility knife, for cutting self-stick membrane
– Caulk gun, to dispense silicone sealant

Steps for How to Replace Basement Bulkhead Doors:
1. Cut through the hinges on the old bulkhead door using a right-angle grinder fitted with a cutoff wheel. Remove both doors.
2. Use the grinder to grind off the screw heads from the brackets that secure the bulkhead to the foundation.
3. Pry off the metal frame of the old bulkhead.
4. Remove the header along the top of the opening, but don't disturb the existing flashing.
5. Mix up a batch of grout using a 1/2-inch drill and a mixing paddle.
6. Liberally brush water onto the exposed concrete foundation around the bulkhead opening.
7. Apply grout along the top of the foundation walls with a pointed brick trowel. Be sure to fill all voids and cracks.
8. Once the grout cures, cut and install pressure-treated 2×10 sills to the top of the foundation wall. Screw the sills to the house framing.
9. Fasten the 2×10 sills to the top of the foundation with masonry screws. Drill screw-shank clearance holes through the 2x10s, then bore pilot holes down into the concrete foundation with a hammer-drill.
10. Use a cordless drill to drive a 3-inch masonry screw into each pilot hole.
11. Install a pressure-treated 2×6 sill across the bottom of the bulkhead opening.
12. Cut the 2x10s sills to length, flush with the bottom sill.
13. Begin installing the new bulkhead door by setting the bottom foundation plate across the bottom of the opening.
14. Mark the foundation plate to the proper length, then cut it with the grinder.
15. Next, use the grinder to cut the two side foundation plates to length.
16. Remove the foundation plates and apply self-stick membrane to the top surfaces of all the pressure-treated sills.
17. Spray a coat of metal primer onto the fresh-cut ends of the foundation plates.
18. Set the foundation plates on top of the pressure-treated sills.
19. Apply a thick bead of silicone sealant along the flashing at the top of the opening.
20. Slide the bulkhead's metal header underneath the flashing, then press it down into the silicone sealant.
21. Set the doorframe on top of the foundation plates and secure it with nuts and bolts.
22. Drill pilot holes through the foundation plates, then secure the doorframe with sheet-metal screws.
23. Use a utility knife to trim off the excess flashing across the top of the bulkhead doors.
24. Apply a bead of silicone sealant across the header, directly beneath the flashing. Press the flashing down into the sealant.
25. Install the two bulkhead doors. Close the doors and check to confirm they're square in the opening. If not, adjust the doorframe.
26. Once satisfied with the fit of the doors, finish screwing down the doorframe.
27. Attach the torsion springs to the inside of each door.
28. Apply silicone sealant around the inside and outside perimeter of each door.
29. Spray primer onto each exposed screwhead.
30. Protect the new bulkhead doors with a coat of exterior-grade oil-based paint.

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Interior Design – How To Design A Bright & Edgy Loft

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 3, 2016

Designer Stephane Chamard discusses how he transformed a dated loft into a bright space with sculptural pieces and hits of color. Get inspired to add a bit of edge to an all-white space!

Stephane painted the open-concept loft white to make it feel more light and bright, then layered in pops of color throughout. Electric blue is found in sculptural chairs that create a focal point in the living room, as well as accessories used throughout. The kitchen is almost hidden with its all-white palette and large drawers. Stairs lead to an elevated bedroom decked out in red and orange furnishings, while large pieces of art dress up the walls and add personality to the space.
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How to Fit a Salvaged Door in an Existing Opening

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 2, 2016

Watch the full episode: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/tv/ask-toh/video/0,,,00.html

Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva takes a homeowner’s salvaged door and uses several tricks to make it fit. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)

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Shopping List for How to Fit a Salvaged Door in an Existing Opening:
– 2×4 piece of poplar

Tools for How to Fit a Salvaged Door in an Existing Opening:
– Drill-Driver or screwdriver
– Hand plane
– Track saw
– Scribes
– Utility knife
– Speed square
– Screws
– Wood glue

Steps for How to Fit a Salvaged Door in an Existing Opening:
1. Remove the hinges from the doorframe using a driver in reverse or a screwdriver.
2. Remove the hinges from the door using a driver in reverse or a screwdriver.
3. Place door in opening and push it up tight to the header.
4. Use a pair of scribes to follow the angle of the gap between the header and the door starting at the widest gap and tracing until the lowest gap.
5. Cut the marked portion of the door using a track saw.
6. Take a small piece of wood and line it up with the top hinge. Mark it 1/8-inch longer than the door to account for the space between the header and the door.
7. Also mark the distance on the wood from the edge of the hinge to the face of the door. Now, that can serve as a gauge for making the hinge points in the doorframe.
8. Now, place the gauge tight against the underside of the doorframe. Using it as a guide, match up the hinge with the edge on the gauge. That’s where you want the hinge to be placed.
9. Drill holes through the holes in the hinge and drive in screws.
10. Mount the bottom hinge by using the same reference lines on the gauge.
11. Close the door and see how it fits into the opening.
12. If there is a gap between the door and the frame on the hinge side, you may have to mortise out the hinges.
13. Next, check the distance between the door and the floor. If there’s a gap, you may have to account for it by adding a piece.
14. Measure the distance between the door and the floor at its highest point. Take that measurement and subtract 1/8-inch and that’s what you’ll want for the added length.
15. To add the extra piece of door, take the measured piece of poplar and glue it to the bottom using wood glue.
16. Then drive in two screws at the bottom to keep it together.
17. Using a hand plane, plane door the piece of poplar until it’s level with the rest of the door.
18. To create a fake seam to match the rail of the door, use a speed square as a straight edge and a utility knife to mark the poplar. Go over the cut several times.

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How a Plumbing Trap Can Lose Water

Posted by in Home Improvement Tips, on May 2, 2016

Watch the full episode: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/tv/ask-toh/video/0,,,00.html

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey explains several reasons why a trap may be losing water. (See steps below.)

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Steps for How a Plumbing Trap Can Lose Water:
1. If a washing machine drains a toilet, it could be because the system is not vented properly and air is being pulled in through the toilet. One possible solution would be to install an air admittance vent to let air in, but not let sewer gas out.
2. Traps can also lose their water from oscillation, which means too much air from wind outside the house could be getting into the pipes and may bounce the water out of the bowl.
3. An “s” trap could also empty a trap. Those are illegal in nearly every state. The long leg of pipe attached to the trap could be pulling the water right out of the trap due to too much velocity in the water as it moves through the pipes.
4. Capillary action could also be a culprit if something is stuck inside the pipe and it is wicking the water from the toilet bowl.
5. Evaporation is another possibility with the water just evaporating into the air in a dry house.

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